Gilroy Chamber Business Focus-October 2021

October 25, 2021

Gilroy Chamber Travels to DC

The Gilroy Chamber of Commerce hosted a trip to our Nation’s Capital during the week of October 11-16. With 15 Chamber members and guests, the group toured various sites including, the Lincoln Memorial, Viet Nam War Memorial, Korean War Memorial, World War II Memorial, Washington Monument, Mt. Vernon, and Old Town Alexandria. 

The group also toured Arlington National Cemetery where they were able to place a wreath honoring the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Chair of the Board, Danny Mitchell; President/CEO, Mark Turner; Past Chair of the Board, Lisa Faria; and Chamber member Mel Rodinsky participated in the ceremony where they placed a wreath with a “Gilroy Chamber of Commerce” banner at the tomb. 

Danny Mitchell indicated the opportunity to participate in the ceremony was “quite an honor.” Lisa Faria said, “The experience was very emotional.” She went on to say, “I was doing fine until the bugler played Taps, and then I almost lost it.” 

According to the Arlington National Cemetery website, in October 1921 four bodies of unidentified U.S. military personnel were exhumed from different American military cemeteries in France. On October 23, 1921, the four caskets arrived at the city hall of Châlons-sur-Marne (now called Châlons-en-Champagne), France.

Town officials and members of the U.S. Army’s Quartermaster Corps had prepared the city hall for the selection ceremony. Early on the morning of October 24, 1921, Maj. Robert P. Harbold of the  Quartermaster Corps, aided by French and American soldiers, rearranged the caskets so that each rested on a shipping case other than the one in which it had arrived. Major Harbold then chose Sgt. Edward F. Younger of Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, 50th Infantry, American Forces in Germany, to select the Unknown Soldier. Sgt. Younger selected the Unknown by placing a spray of white roses on one of the caskets.

From Châlons-sur-Marne, the Unknown journeyed by caisson and rail to the port town of Le Havre, France. From Le Havre, the USS Olympia transported the Unknown Soldier’s casket to Washington, D.C. The Unknown arrived at the Washington Navy Yard on November 9, 1921. After arriving in Washington, D.C. on November 9, 1921, the Unknown lay in state in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda. About 90,000 visitors paid their respects during the public visiting period on November 10, 1921.

On November 11, 1921, the Unknown was placed on a horse-drawn caisson and carried in a procession through Washington, D.C. and across the Potomac River. A state funeral ceremony was held at Arlington National Cemetery’s new Memorial Amphitheater, and the Unknown was interred in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Nationwide, Americans observed two minutes of silence at the beginning of the ceremony. President Warren G. Harding officiated at the ceremony and placed the Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest military decoration, on the casket. Numerous foreign dignitaries presented their nations’ highest awards, as well.

Click here to watch the Gilroy Chamber of Commerce Honor the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

City of Gilroy Hosting Business Community Meeting

​​The City of Gilroy is hosting a Business Community Meeting in partnership with Morgan Hill to receive feedback on a new proposed ordinance. The draft ordinance can be viewed in advance by going to rebrand.ly/OrganicWasteDisposal.

Of special concern are businesses in the following areas: supermarkets, grocery stores, food service providers, food distributors, wholesale food vendors, food recovery organizations and services, restaurants, hotels with on-site food facilities, health facilities with on-site food facilities, large venues, large events, or a state agency with a cafeteria and local educational facilities with on-site food facilities.

Mandatory Organic Waste Disposal Reduction Ordinance

This ordinance enforces SB 1383, which requires residents and businesses to separate their organic wastes from the trash and participate in organic waste recycling programs. It also requires many restaurants and institutions to participate in edible food rescue programs. This ordinance, required by state law, will affect how residents and businesses manage organic wastes.

October 27, 2021

3:00 p.m. | Virtual Meeting on Zoom

Access Link: bit.ly/BusinessCommunityZoom | Meeting passcode: 169011

Or dial (669) 900-9128 and enter the meeting ID: 881 0413 2717#.

Spanish translation will be provided.

Last Chance to Nominate!

The Gilroy Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors invites the community to nominate individuals and businesses for the 2022 Spice of Life awards. Applications are available online at gilroy.org and at the Gilroy Chamber office with the deadline to submit Friday, October 29, 2021.

Categories include:

  • 2022 Man and Woman of the Year – designed to acknowledge those persons who have a history of unselfish service to the community, contributing to Gilroy’s welfare and betterment.  
  • 2022 Small and Large Business of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding Gilroy Chamber of Commerce business that has demonstrated an extraordinary level of excellence and success in areas such as management skills, innovation, personal commitment, community involvement and support, and a contribution to the entrepreneurial spirit. Separate categories are presented based on business size with small businesses being 25 full or part-time employees or less and large businesses with 26 and above full or part-time employees.  
  • 2022 Gilroy Educator of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding individual who has made a significant contribution within the educational community of Gilroy. 
  • 2022 Firman B. Voorhies Volunteer of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding Gilroy Chamber of Commerce volunteer. 
  • 2022 Non-Profit of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding non-profit organization in Gilroy.  
  • 2022 Young Professional of the Year – designed to recognize the accomplishments of a highly motivated young professional who works or lives in South County. Nominees for this award must be between the ages of 21-40 years old. 
Updates On Federal Relief Funding For Small Businesses: What’s Next On The Docket

Federal relief programs for small businesses are slowly coming to an end, and with only a few months left in the year, we’ve put together a list of resources that may have already expired or are about to expire. 

What’s still available

SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loans

The Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program is still accepting new applications for COVID-19 Economic Injury Disaster Loans. EIDLs are low-interest loans of up to $2 million that are available to pay for expenses that could have been met had the disaster not occurred, including payroll and other operating expenses. If you have previously applied and not heard a decision, do not reapply. 

Read more

SBA’s 7(a) Loan Program

The 7(a) loan program is the SBA’s primary initiative for providing financial assistance to small businesses. The terms and conditions, like the guaranty percentage and loan amount, may vary depending on the type of loan you may choose to pursue to fit your small business needs. While the SBA was forgiving up to six months of principal and interest for new 7(a) loans, that program expired at the end of September. 

Read more

Targeted EIDL Advance Grant Programs 

As the SBA agency works to provide further economic relief for the smallest and hardest hit businesses across the United States, the Targeted EIDL Advance program and the Supplemental Targeted Advance continue to provide additional relief to eligible business owners located in underserved communities and who have been hard-hit by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read more

Paycheck Protection Program Loan Forgiveness

The SBA launched a Payment Protection Program (PPP) Direct Forgiveness Portal to help streamline the forgiveness process for loans of $150,000 or under, and allow small business owners to apply directly through the SBA. Learn about the Direct Forgiveness Portal here. 

Additionally, the SBA implemented the Revenue Reduction Score to help streamline the review of revenue reduction documentation.

Employee Retention Credit

The federal government created the Employee Retention Credit (ERC) in response to the detrimental effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on small businesses. The ERC offers tax credits to encourage more businesses to retain employees during the pandemic, as a temporary measure.

Read more

What you may have missed

Shuttered Venue Operators Grant 

Though the Shuttered Venue Operators (SVO) Grant is no longer accepting new applications, the SVO portal remains open to all active applicants and awardees. ​The SBA announced a supplemental grant program for SVO grant recipients, and will be sending invitations for supplemental awards. SVO supplemental awards will be provided to grant recipients who received an initial grant and can demonstrate a 70% loss when comparing 2021’s first-quarter revenues to the same in 2019.

Read more

Restaurant Revitalization Fund 

The Restaurant Revitalization Fund (RRF) provided relief funding for restaurants and bars affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The RRF, which was established by the American Rescue Plan, offered $28.6 billion in grants for small businesses in need. This program is no longer accepting applications but we will continue to update this blog, should Congress allocate additional funding for this program.

Read more

California Paid Family Leave Small Business Grant Program

The California Employment Training Panel (ETP) and the California Labor and Workforce Development Agency (LWDA), announces the availability of up to $1,000,000 in California State General Fund dollars, for California Small Businesses impacted by the Paid Family Leave Program, in order to help offset the costs incurred when training employees to cover the duties of the individual utilizing Paid Family Leave.

The PFL program allows California workers to take paid leave to bond with a new child (through birth, adoption, or foster care) or to care for a seriously ill family member. Beginning July 1, 2020, this leave has been expanded from six to eight weeks. Additionally, the program is also expanding the 12 week non-paid protected leave to all businesses, regardless of business size.

Businesses that are impacted by the PFL program will have increased costs such as: training and upskilling existing staff to cover the duties of the employee on PFL, hiring and training additional staff to cover the duties of the employee on PFL, and the marketing, recruitment, and training costs to cover these activities.

The Paid Family Leave Small Business (PFLSB) Grant will provide to California Small Businesses of less than 10 employees $500 for each employee who is utilizing the PFL Program, up to a total of $4,500 per small business, to help offset the costs involved with training other employees to cover the duties of this individual on leave.

Apply Here.

October 18, 2021

City of Gilroy Hosting Business Community Meeting

​​The City of Gilroy is hosting a Business Community Meeting in partnership with Morgan Hill to receive feedback on a new proposed ordinance. The draft ordinance can be viewed in advance by going to rebrand.ly/OrganicWasteDisposal.

Of special concern are businesses in the following areas: supermarkets, grocery stores, food service providers, food distributors, wholesale food vendors, food recovery organizations and services, restaurants, hotels with on-site food facilities, health facilities with on-site food facilities, large venues, large events, or a state agency with a cafeteria and local educational facilities with on-site food facilities.

Mandatory Organic Waste Disposal Reduction Ordinance

This ordinance enforces SB 1383, which requires residents and businesses to separate their organic wastes from the trash and participate in organic waste recycling programs. It also requires many restaurants and institutions to participate in edible food rescue programs. This ordinance, required by state law, will affect how residents and businesses manage organic wastes.

October 27, 2021

3:00 p.m. | Virtual Meeting on Zoom

Access Link: bit.ly/BusinessCommunityZoom | Meeting passcode: 169011

Or dial (669) 900-9128 and enter the meeting ID: 881 0413 2717#.

Spanish translation will be provided.

Gilroy Unified School District (GUSD) Round-Up

With the beginning of the 2021-22 school year, resuming in-person learning for staff and students has meant a return to normalcy and routine.  While the transition back to the classroom has had some challenges, the overwhelming response has been positive for all.  Here are some highlights from the first quarter of the school year:

Return to in-person learning:  On August 18, the Gilroy Unified School District welcomed over 10,600 students and almost 1,100 staff members back to 14 campuses throughout our District.  GUSD staff worked tirelessly to implement strict safety measures to ensure the health of our school communities as students and staff returned to our campuses after 18 months at home.  As directives from health officials at the federal, state, and county levels continue to evolve, GUSD has implemented a number of safety protocols, including: indoor mask requirements for anyone on a school campus or district facility; closed campuses to visitors and volunteers; a full update of all district ventilation systems; and daily at-home health checks for all employees and families before coming to school.

Vaccination clinics at GUSD schools: The vaccination clinic at Gilroy High School provided over 70,000 vaccines to people between February and July 2021.  Additionally, the Santa Clara County Department of Public Health has held mobile vaccine clinics at seven schools in GUSD to date, providing over 2,000 additional vaccines to community members, 12 and older.  With the anticipation of a vaccine approval for children between ages 5-11 in the near future, GUSD has already committed campus availability for more mobile vaccine clinics, to provide opportunities for the Public Health Department to provide vaccines for community members who are ready to be vaccinated.

Mt. Madonna Continuation High School (MHHS) and Eliot Elementary named 2021 California PBIS Coalition Platinum Award Winners: Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is an evidence-based three-tiered framework for improving and integrating all of the data, systems, and practices affecting student outcomes every day. It is a system of support that creates school environments where all students can be successful.  MMHS and Eliot are two of only 150 schools in California to receive this distinction this year.

As a community, we are entering the fall season feeling grateful for so many things, but mostly for a sense of normalcy as we resume old traditions and look forward to new memories.  Thanks to those of you who provide support for our staff, students, and families, in our classrooms and in our community.

California Venues Grant Program Website Launched
Program opens 10/29/2021 through 11/19/2021
Full website can be found at cavenuesgrant.com

The California Venues Grant Program will support eligible independent live events venues that have been affected by COVID-19 in order to support their continued operation. Eligible independent live events venues must have a physical address and operate in California, which will be validated through submitted business tax returns.

Grants awarded under this Program shall be in an amount equal to the lesser of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars ($250,000) or 20 percent of the applicant’s gross earned revenue in California for the 2019 taxable year.

Additional information can be found at cavenuesgrant.com

Nominate a Non-Profit!

The Gilroy Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors invites the community to nominate individuals and businesses for the 2022 Spice of Life awards. Applications are available online at gilroy.org and at the Gilroy Chamber office with the deadline to submit Friday, October 29, 2021. Categories include:

  • 2022 Man and Woman of the Year – designed to acknowledge those persons who have a history of unselfish service to the community, contributing to Gilroy’s welfare and betterment.  
  • 2022 Small and Large Business of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding Gilroy Chamber of Commerce business that has demonstrated an extraordinary level of excellence and success in areas such as management skills, innovation, personal commitment, community involvement and support, and a contribution to the entrepreneurial spirit. Separate categories are presented based on business size with small businesses being 25 full or part-time employees or less and large businesses with 26 and above full or part-time employees.  
  • 2022 Gilroy Educator of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding individual who has made a significant contribution within the educational community of Gilroy. 
  • 2022 Firman B. Voorhies Volunteer of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding Gilroy Chamber of Commerce volunteer. 
  • 2022 Non-Profit of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding non-profit organization in Gilroy.  
  • 2022 Young Professional of the Year – designed to recognize the accomplishments of a highly motivated young professional who works or lives in South County. Nominees for this award must be between the ages of 21-40 years old. 

October 11, 2021

Gilroy Chamber Opposing Taxes Against Businesses

The Gilroy Chamber of Commerce, CalChamber, and other business organizations are standing up to protect local businesses from higher taxes due to the $3.5 trillion reconciliation package. The letter below is being sent to California Congressional Delegation Members. 

Dear California Congressional Delegation Members:

The California Chamber of Commerce and listed organizations urge you to reject proposals in Congress to increase taxes on large and small businesses to pay for the massive $3.5 trillion reconciliation package. Employers have suffered staggering financial setbacks as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and the reconciliation bill will only add to that struggle while they are attempting to rebuild, recover and deal with acute workforce shortages. 

With a state corporate tax rate of 8.84%, the current proposal to increase the federal corporate rate from 21% to 26.5% will result in California corporations paying a combined rate of over 35% – that’s roughly ten points higher than the weighted average rate of every other developed nation on Earth.  Our rate would be 10 points higher than China and nearly 14 points higher than the average rate in the European Union (21.7%).  In other words, the proposal to increase the federal corporate tax rate will put California corporations at a severe competitive disadvantage. 

California residents are not immune from the effects of higher corporate taxes. Millions of residential utility ratepayers will see higher utility bills from increased taxes levied on gas and electric utilities. Utility providers regulated by the California Public Utilities Commission must pass along the increased costs resulting from higher taxes directly to consumers. 

We also oppose changes to the Global Intangible Low-Tax Income (GILTI) tax.  California’s economy and thousands of our employers are highly dependent on international trade and investment. Our economic success depends on our ability to compete in a global marketplace.  Changes to GILTI would not only result in additional large tax increases on many California-based companies, but the combination of GILTI changes and the increase in the corporate tax rate will make California an outlier, again putting our companies at a competitive disadvantage with their foreign competitors. 

Congress isn’t just taking aim at corporations. They are also considering significant tax increases on the pass-through business sector, including raising the top individual tax rate, lowering the top rate’s threshold, imposing the 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT) to all forms of business income, and capping the 199A deduction.  

Coupled with the California’s top-heavy income tax, this package of rate hikes would increase the top rate on our state’s pass-through businesses to over 50% of their taxable income. 

Finally, Congress is considering raising the capital gains tax to 25%.  When factoring California’s own taxes on capital gains, most investors in the state will end up paying a combined capital gains rate of over 35%.  The rate increase will affect approximately two-thirds of capital investment in the U.S. and could dampen investments in California start-ups and hurt California families as they save for retirement or look to buy a new home.

Many California employers are vulnerable as they continue to rebuild and recover from the pandemic. The tax increases contained within the reconciliation package will further cloud California’s difficult business climate and stifle job growth at a time it is desperately needed.

Gavilan College Superintendent / President Announces Retirement

At the October 7, 2021 Board of Trustees Development meeting, Dr. Kathleen A. Rose announced her plans for retirement at the end of the 2021-2022 Academic Year. She has served in this position since 2016.

“We are grateful for the years of service and many contributions Dr. Rose has made to the students of our district”, said Edwin Diaz, President of the Gavilan College Board of Trustees. “In addition to many accomplishments, Dr. Rose’s tenure has been marked by significant challenges, including the unprecedented challenge of the Covid-19 pandemic. Through her leadership the college maintained valuable services to students and the communities we serve. We wish her well in her retirement.” The Board of Trustees will begin discussing the recruitment of a new president over the coming months.

Dr. Rose’s legacy at Gavilan includes the successful passage of the Measure X Bond in 2018, celebration of the college’s Centennial in 2019-2020, reaffirmation of the college’s accreditation. Her tenure included the multitude of challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, which necessitated the rapid transition of all instruction and services from in-person to remote in a matter of days, the development of new safety protocols, leadership of a largely remote workforce for over a year, and meticulous planning for the return to campus. This followed an unprecedented cybersecurity attack, and a changing state funding formula that created financial stress for the district.

2021-2022 marks her 40-year career in career in higher education and 13th at Gavilan College, where she joined the administration as Vice President of Instruction in 2008. Prior to that she served as the Vice President for Instruction at Hartnell College. She has continued to teach at the graduate level, serve in leadership roles in the community, and present research nationally and internationally. Her retirement, planned with the input and support of her family, will begin following the 2021-2022 academic year.

Following the Board meeting, Dr. Rose sent the following letter to staff and students at the college:

Dear Gavilan College Community,

Tonight I notified the Board of Trustees of my intent to retire on July 1, 2022. This is my fortieth year in higher education as an administrator and faculty member, my 13th year with GJCCD, and 6th as your Superintendent/President. My family and I are ready for a new chapter in my life and after many months of reflecting and deliberating with them on personal and professional reasons to retire, my decision was made.

I am proud of the many accomplishments in our district during my time at Gavilan, with all of you at the center of each achievement. My role as a leader was inspired daily by our courageous students, our dedicated professional support staff, our talented faculty and an equity focused leadership team. Together we celebrated Gavilan’s 100th anniversary, passed the largest GO Bond in the district’s history, and changed together through a global pandemic. Many, many highs and lows were experienced by a community of educators that remained committed to the educational journeys of our students and partnerships within our communities, no matter the social, political, and economic challenges.

As you know, our mission at Gavilan is to “actively engage, empower and enrich students of all backgrounds and abilities to build their full academic, social, and economic potential.” I am proud to have contributed to the culture at Gavilan and represent our collaborative commitment to our mission each day. In my remaining time, I will continue to lead with transparency, equity, and dignity as the district prepares for the next Superintendent/President.

I am grateful that you all took a chance on this farmgirl from upstate NY who has been honored to serve as your president during a critical time in the district’s history. I thank each of you for your support and service to this incredible college.

Warmly,

Kathleen

Nominate a Small Business!

The Gilroy Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors invites the community to nominate individuals and businesses for the 2022 Spice of Life awards. Applications are available online at gilroy.org and at the Gilroy Chamber office with the deadline to submit Friday, October 29, 2021. Categories include:

  • 2022 Man and Woman of the Year – designed to acknowledge those persons who have a history of unselfish service to the community, contributing to Gilroy’s welfare and betterment.  
  • 2022 Small and Large Business of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding Gilroy Chamber of Commerce business that has demonstrated an extraordinary level of excellence and success in areas such as management skills, innovation, personal commitment, community involvement and support, and a contribution to the entrepreneurial spirit. Separate categories are presented based on business size with small businesses being 25 full or part-time employees or less and large businesses with 26 and above full or part-time employees.  
  • 2022 Gilroy Educator of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding individual who has made a significant contribution within the educational community of Gilroy. 
  • 2022 Firman B. Voorhies Volunteer of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding Gilroy Chamber of Commerce volunteer. 
  • 2022 Non-Profit of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding non-profit organization in Gilroy.  
  • 2022 Young Professional of the Year – designed to recognize the accomplishments of a highly motivated young professional who works or lives in South County. Nominees for this award must be between the ages of 21-40 years old. 
PAGA Reform?

Business Community Launches Private Attorneys General Act Reform Ballot Measure

the purpose is to change existing law to provide better results for workers without having to use an attorney

By Chris Micheli, California Globe

On October 5, 2021, three major business trade associations, filed a new initiative measure with the Attorney General’s Office for title and summary, the first official step in their effort to place on the November 2022 statewide ballot changes to California’s Private Attorneys General Act (PAGA). The California Chamber of Commerce, California New Car Dealers Association, and Western Growers Association filed the measure, which essentially repeals the PAGA statutes and inserts new language.

Section One of the ballot measure would amend Part 13 of Division 2 of the Labor Code, commencing with Section 2698, which is the PAGA statute. First, it would strike PAGA as the title of this Part of the Labor Code and instead Part 13 would be titled “the Labor Code Fair Pay and Employer Accountability Act of 2022.”

Second, the measure would set forth four findings and declarations by the People (who would enact these statutory changes if this measure is placed on the ballot and passed by a majority vote of the electors). The first finding is that most employers comply full with the labor laws, but some companies do disregard their legal obligations. The second finding is that the State must reform the system so that employees owed monies are paid quickly.

The third finding is that employers who cheat workers should be held accountable, but that small businesses that comply with the law should be protected from frivolous lawsuits. The fourth finding is that enforcement of existing laws should not depend on our overburdened courts, but rather a process that does not require the employee to hire an attorney nor go into court to recover what is properly due to them

Third, the measure would provide an extensive statement of purpose, which is fundamentally to further protect workers from violations of the Labor Code. Here, the purpose is to change existing law to provide better results for workers without having to use an attorney; ensure that state regulators enforce the laws so that workers get paid with filing a lawsuit; focus on “bad actor” employers by doubling penalties for businesses that willfully violate the law; changing existing law that awards only 25% of penalties to the employee; and, provide resources to employers to assist in complying with the state’s complex labor and employment laws.

Fourth, the measure would specify that, for all violations of the Labor Code, with certain exceptions, that are enforceable by the Labor Commissioner, then the Commissioner can award a civil penalty of $100 per pay period to the aggrieved employee for an initial violation and $200 per pay period for each subsequent violation.

However, for all willful violations of the Labor Code, the Labor Commissioner may award double these amounts. The term “willful” is defined as the employer knowing that the act or omission violated the law and either intentionally failed to comply or failed to take any reasonable action to comply with the law. All of these penalties that are assessed are to be distributed to the aggrieved employee.

Fifth, the measure would provide that the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement must be a part to any employee complaint that is filed with the Labor Commissioner. And, an arbitration agreement does not have any effect on any complaint filed by an employee with the Labor Commissioner.

Sixth, the measure would require the Legislature to ensure that all necessary funding is provided to the DLSE in order to meet all of the DLSE’s mandates under the Labor Code.

Seventh, the measure would prohibit attorneys’ fees from being awarded in any action under Part 13, including any hearing before the Labor Commissioner, with specified exceptions.

Eighth, the measure would require the DLSE to create and maintain a “Consultation and Policy Publication Unit” for the purpose of providing information, advice, and assistance to employers, employees, and the public regarding the laws enforced by the DLSE. Any employee complaints to the CPPU must be redirected to the enforcement unit of the DLSE. This new CPPU would have sole responsibility at DLSE to maintain and keep current information on the DLSE website to clarify how the DLSE interprets and enforces the laws.

Ninth, the measure would ensure that an employer that is not subject to a pending DLSE enforcement action is entitled to request a confidential consultation with the CPPU and employers would have the opportunity to correct, without any penalty, any violations revealed pursuant to this consultation. In addition, the consultation’s findings are to be recorded in a confidential written report and be binding on the DLSE, unless at a later date the report is withdraw or amended.

Tenth, the measure would specify that, if the report identifies any violations, then those violations must be corrected within a reasonable time frame, but no more than 60 days. Moreover, an employer may request in writing that the CPPU issue a compliance advice letter to answer questions about how the employer is to comply with a statute or regulation enforced by the DLSE. Thereafter, the DLSE must issue such a compliance advice letter within three months of the written request.

Eleventh, the measure would provide that every compliance advice letter must be published on the DLSE’s website and is binding on the DLSE unless it is later withdrawn or amended. The DLSE cannot enforce a changed advice letter for thirty days, and the DLSE must continue to comply with the Administrative Procedure Act.

Twelfth, the measure would require an ombudsperson to be housed within the Department of Industrial Relations, and this person reports to the DIR director. The DLSE is prohibited from contracting with any non-governmental entity or attorney to pursue any claim or legal action against an employer on behalf of the DLSE. No investigatory information can be publicly disclosed until the investigation has been concluded and a decision has been made by the DLSE.

Thirteenth, the measure would provide that all funds received by the Labor and Workforce Development Agency pursuant to the PAGA statute be redirected to the Labor Enforcement and Compliance Fund.

Fourteenth, the measure would amend existing law related to the Labor Commissioner’s Field Enforcement Unit to ensure the FEU maximizes efficiency, effectiveness, and timeliness of enforcement of labor laws. Moreover, the Labor Commissioner would have additional requirements for its enforcement plan, including reviewing compliance for those targeted for enforcement. And identifying changes to be made to the plan to improve it.

Fifteenth, the measure would amend existing law to allow the DLSE to provide notice with a subpoena duces tecum (to produce documents) of reasonable assumptions that will be made about the information sought. These assumptions are binding unless specified conditions are met.

Sixteenth, the measure would require, by March 1, 2022 and annually thereafter, that the DLSE submit a report to the Department of Finance and the Legislature’s budget and policy committees containing certain required information.

Seventeenth, the measure contains a severability clause. And, finally, the measure states that this initiative is to be liberally construed by the courts in order to promote its purposes, and that the Legislature cannot amend this statutory language unless a bill is passed by ¾ vote of both houses of the Legislature and that furthers the purposes of this act.

Gilroy Chamber and California Hispanic Chamber Alliance

In order to develop greater alliances, stronger advocacy efforts, and helpful information for our members, the Gilroy Chamber of Commerce (GCOC) is a member of the California Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (CHCC). The GCOC and CHCC have been partners for nearly 3 years.

This alliance has enabled the Gilroy Chamber to offer numerous advantages to our members such as:

  • Discounted health care benefits – Garlic City Healthcare Program https://gilroy.org/garlic-city-healthcare/
  • Informational webinars
  • Joint advocacy efforts
  • Business opportunities
  • Promoting economic growth and development

Because we are champions for business, the Gilroy Chamber works closely with various organizations to bring about the best opportunities for success within our community. The CHCC is one of those organizations. Other organizations the Gilroy Chamber partners with are:

  • CalChamber
  • Silicon Valley Chamber Coalition
  • Western Association of Chamber Executives
  • Silicon Economic Development Alliance
  • International Council of Shopping Centers
  • Gilroy Economic Development Partnership

October 4, 2021

Let's Talk Sharks

The first public meeting regarding the Sharks Ice took place on Monday, September 27 with approximately 80 online residents participating. The feedback from the public was very positive as both the president and vice president of the Sharks organization presented information about the project. City Administrator Jimmy Forbis along with Jane Howard, Executive Director of Visit Gilroy also provided information. 

The Sharks Ice project is just one of 3 key initiatives the City is focusing on in order to make Gilroy a recreation destination. The Gilroy Economic Development Partnership, made up of the Gilroy Chamber of Commerce, Visit Gilroy, Gilroy Economic Development Corporation, Gilroy Downtown Business Association, Gilroy Gardens, Gavilan College, and the Garlic Festival Association, came together to develop a direction for the city’s economic development and tourism. 

In September of 2020, the City Council passed a resolution declaring Gilroy as a recreation destination supported by 3 key initiatives:

  • The Sports Park – Sharks Ice
  • Mountain Bike Adventure Park – near Gilroy Gardens
  • Gourmet Alley in Downtown– expanding restaurants and outdoor dining along Gourmet Alley between 4th and 5th Streets.

These 3 initiatives create a “recreation triangle” which serves the greater Gilroy community and creates both direct and indirect revenue-generating opportunities while supporting local businesses, creating jobs, employing local residents, elevating Gilroy’s status as a visitor destination, and expanding our brand. The Gilroy Economic Development Partnership strives to facilitate discussion and a city-wide strategy to ensure that economic development opportunities are identified, nurtured, and give the chance to succeed in Gilroy. 

More public meetings regarding the Sharks Ice project will be announced.

Tourism and Travel Updates with Visit Gilroy & California Welcome Center Gilroy

The World Reunited:  IPW 2021

In late September, more than 2600 attendees from 52 countries gathered in Las Vegas for the 52nd annual IPW – the travel industry’s premier international marketplace and the largest generator of travel to the United States. At IPW, global travel professionals including U.S. destinations, hotels, attractions, sports teams, cruise lines, airlines, and transportation companies gather together to meet with international tour operators, buyers, and wholesalers from around the world. These connections draw future travel and tourism business to the U.S. and facilitate an industry-wide recovery.  Visit Gilroy was represented by the Central Coast Tourism Council (CCTC), one of eight rural regions in California. CCTC met with over 40 appointments during the three-day period.

Travel Industry Updates from U.S. Travel Association

In September, domestic airfares are down 5% from September 2019; international fares are down about 8%. Flight bookings rapidly declined in August and early September amid a surge in COVID-19 cases fueled by the highly transmissible Delta variant. Revenue in the hotel sector is projected to be down $59 billion this year compared with 2019.

Welcome Center September Highlights

We’re so happy to be welcoming people to Gilroy and the Golden State again! In September 2021, walk-in visitors to the California Welcome Center Gilroy increased by over 42% over the prior year, and our retail sales increased 45%. We welcomed visitors from over 16 different countries and 22 different states. Our most popular items sold were California logo items and Gilroy Gardens items. (The stuffed “Gil” and “Roy” dolls are always popular!)

The California Welcome Center is open Monday – Saturday (10am-5pm) and Sunday (11am-5pm). If you’re looking for things to do in Gilroy, be sure to check the Visit Gilroy website calendar: www.visitgilroy.com/upcomingevents.

Nominate your Favorite Young Professional!

The Gilroy Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors invites the community to nominate individuals and businesses for the 2022 Spice of Life awards. Applications are available online at gilroy.org and at the Gilroy Chamber office with the deadline to submit Friday, October 8, 2021. Categories include:

  • 2022 Man and Woman of the Year – designed to acknowledge those persons who have a history of unselfish service to the community, contributing to Gilroy’s welfare and betterment.  
  • 2022 Small and Large Business of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding Gilroy Chamber of Commerce business that has demonstrated an extraordinary level of excellence and success in areas such as management skills, innovation, personal commitment, community involvement and support, and a contribution to the entrepreneurial spirit. Separate categories are presented based on business size with small businesses being 25 full or part-time employees or less and large businesses with 26 and above full or part-time employees.  
  • 2022 Gilroy Educator of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding individual who has made a significant contribution within the educational community of Gilroy. 
  • 2022 Firman B. Voorhies Volunteer of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding Gilroy Chamber of Commerce volunteer. 
  • 2022 Non-Profit of the Year – designed to recognize an outstanding non-profit organization in Gilroy.  
  • 2022 Young Professional of the Year – designed to recognize the accomplishments of a highly motivated young professional who works or lives in South County. Nominees for this award must be between the ages of 21-40 years old. 
Developer Initiated Application to Amend the City's Urban Service Area Boundary

On July 30, 2021, the City of Gilroy received an application to amend the City’s Urban Service Area (USA) boundary from Integral Communities, a local development company. If approved, this amendment would add approximately 194.5 acres to the City’s southern limits. The proposed project site is within the City’s Urban Growth Boundary (UGB) but outside the USA boundary.

The USA is the area of land to which the City is already committed to providing basic infrastructure services for urban development. The UGB was instituted by voter approval of Measure H in 2016 and is the area of land within the planning boundary, or sphere of influence, intended for future urbanization.

The boundaries of both the USA and UGB are shown on the included map, with the USA boundary shown by a dashed blue line and the UGB boundary shown by a solid red line. The proposed project site is shown in orange and has a land use designation of Neighborhood District High.

This developer-initiated process and application is currently under review by City staff and will require the preparation and review of several documents, including but not limited to environmental review, a fiscal impact analysis, and a plan for services. The purpose of these documents is to analyze potentially significant impacts from the project and ensure that the project site can be adequately served by infrastructure (e.g., water and sewer) and public services (e.g., police and fire). The plan for services document must also identify how these services will be financed. The City currently is seeking qualified consultants to prepare these documents and is accepting proposals through noon on October 20.

Upon completion of the document preparation and review, the Planning Commission and City Council will hold public hearings on the project prior to the City Council deciding whether or not the application can be submitted to the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) for approval. LAFCO is a state-mandated independent local agency established to oversee the boundaries of cities and special districts in Santa Clara County. The City of Gilroy is required to obtain LAFCO’s approval prior to extending services outside its urban service area boundary.

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